Hardanger: Basic Stitches, Cutwork, Bar Weaving and Fill-in Stitches

The Hardanger Satin Stitch:
The hardanger satin stitch is the basic, the foundation stitch for hardanger embroidery.

The hardanger stitch is different from a surface or embroidery satin stitch, but they are similar in that the stitching threads do not cross over each other and you do not pierce the thread of any previous stitches.

A surface embroidered satin stitch is often padded and the outline stitch is used to give height to the edge, and the tip of the needle may pierce the fabric thread as you bring the stitching thread through.

The hardanger satin stitch is a single layer (not padded); the tip of the needle always comes up in a fabric hole, the needle never pierces the fabric thread or a stitching thread. Also the start and end tails of the stitching thread are secured by weaving through existing worked area. To see this click here to view my blog page discussion No Knots Please!

Hardanger satin stitch

Hardanger satin stitch

Hardanger satin stitches are used to create kloster blocks and for use within geometric-shape patterns. Notice how alike the back looks to the front on the hardanger flower shape and kloster blocks shown in this photo.

Hardanger

Click this photo to view my kloster block discussion.

Kloster blocks:
Hardanger satin stitches are the foundation building block to create kloster blocks and geometric-shape stylized flowers.

Snipping edge

A traditional edge for Hardanger designs is the buttonhole (blanket) stitch. To view discussion and photos click this photo.

The Buttonhole Edge Stitch: In Hardanger designs the buttonhole (blanket) stitched edge is worked so that the excess fabric outside of the worked design area can be trimmed away. In order to do this you need to ensure that the loop of each buttonhole edge stitch is snug … to lock the stitch in place.

I have read blog postings of hardanger stitchers who like to machine stitch one or two lines on the fabric underneath the to-be-worked buttonhole edge. This might be a good idea if you are unsure of your thread tension or plan to hand wash your finished piece now and then.

cutwork area trio

Cutwork area trio. Click this photo to view my blog page discussing cutwork and determining which fabric threads can be snipped and removed and which can’t be snipped within a kloster block area.

Cutwork:
Specific fabric threads can be snipped and removed within correctly constructed two-, three- and four-sided kloster blocks.  For a review of kloster block stitching click the kloster block photo (within the Hardanger Satin Stitch section above) to access my kloster block blog page.  

  • In order to incorporate cutwork into a two-sided kloster area, each two-sided kloster block must have a horizontal and a vertical opposite mirror-image two-sided kloster block.
  • For three-sided kloster block area you need three sides with the middle side perpendicular and sharing a common corner fabric hole with the adjoining sides. Plus a three-sided kloster block when used within cutwork needs a mirror-image three-sided kloster block.
  • For four-sided kloster blocks, each side must share a fabric hole with the common corner of the adjoining perpendicular sides and have a mirror-image opposite side.
Santa Nestled in Spruce Trees

Click this photo to view my blog page discussing cutwork and determining which fabric threads can be snipped and removed and which can’t be snipped within a kloster block area.

 

dual closeup

Click this photo to view my discussion of bar weaving, picot loops and spokes.

Bar Weaving: The three styles of of bar weaving I have used are: wrapped bars, buttonhole worked bars and figure-8 looped bars. Along with fill-in stitches listed below, picot loops and spokes can be added to openwork areas defined by weaved bars.

Click this photo to view my discussion of bar weaving.

Fill-in Stitches that I discuss are shown as hyperlinks below:

spider web dual

spider web examples

Ribbed Spider Web

Fill in examples

Example of eyelets, Greek Cross, Dove Eye fill-in stitches and Picot loops

Dove eyes

Eyelets and Cross Stitches

Greek Cross

Picot loops

Ruby Rosette

Rosette (Struvor) example

Rosette (Struvor)

Twisted X

 

When I am working an area of bar weaving and/or fill-in stitches I like to set back a moment and determine a stitching pathway. Click here to view my blog page discussion of pathways.

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