Sewing the piping onto the front fabric

A few comments:

  1. Shorten the length of your sewing machine stitch.
  2. The raw edge of the piping points out toward the raw edge of your worked piece.
  3. You will be sewing such that the worked side of your design is facing you.
  4. Secure the begin and end of the piping piece so that it looks nice.
  5. Sew so that you stitch as close as possible to the cord inside the piping sleeve without the needle going into the core cotton of the cord. I found using the zipper pressure foot and having the needle position to be furthest out worked best for me at this stage.
  6. Keep your sewing stitches to be along the edge shape of the pillow you are creating.

Securing the piping to front fabric:

Sewing the piping on

Sewing the piping on

Start the machine sewing a few inches in (from the start end of the piping). This start end of the piping will be used when securing the start and end tails of the piping in the next section Sewing the Two Ends of the Piping.

In this photo you can see how I used my fingertip to (1) snug the piping to be right against the underneath worked area and (2) used my fingertip to ensure that the cord inside the piping was pushed to be right against the fold of the piping sleeve.

At this stage I have sewn the beginning end of the piping onto the front fabric and now I am starting to sew (secure the piping) around the edge of the front fabric.

I mentioned above that you need to know the outline (stitching line) for your pillow’s edge. For my Fall leaf pillow and the Nantucket pillow there were drawn dashed lines on the front piece. As I sewed the piping onto the front piece I lifted the piping up every few inches to check that I was stitching along that guideline.For the Waves of Early Fall and the Entwined Pomegranates pillows I wanted the stitched line of the pillow’s edge to be right along the outside of the worked area. The threads used for these worked designs were size 5 perle. The size 5 thread is thick enough that I could feel the edge of the worked area through the material of the piping.

Cross over, sewing start tail of the piping

Cross over, sewing start tail of the piping

After a corner I normally took the pillow out from under the needle, snipped sewing machine threads and examined my progress so far. I went back at one of those times to secure the start tail of the piping.

Pull the start end of the piping out towards the raw edge so that you can sew along the “secure the piping to the front fabric line” and cross over the piping.

I found it was easier on me and the sewing machine to go backwards when first going over the slanted piping.

corners

corners

For me, I found it best to do some angle snipping of the piping sleeve fabric so that it did not bunch as I sewed the corners.

You can also see in this photo and the previous photo that the long stitched machine basing that I did to create the piping sleeve is far away (half inch or more) from the stitched sewing of securing the piping to the front piece. This long stitch basing for the piping sleeve will be gone when I trim excess fabric away before turning the pillow outside out.

slanted corners

slanted corners

I did squared corners for my first three pillows.

For my fourth pillow I decided to do slanted corners.

It was easier to machine sew the slanted corners, less fighting the piping sleeve fabric (to keep it from bunching over).

 

cross over piping

cross over piping

Sewing the two ends of the piping:

This photo shows how I cross the ends of the piping and then sew them. Go slowly, you don’t want to break your sewing machine needle as you go through the thickness of the cord.

Cross over beginning and end

Cross over beginning and end

Left photo shows sewing across the slanted start tail of the piping.

Right photo shows securing slanted tail end of the piping.

cross over piping

cross over piping

WIP of when I have finished the pillow and pulled it to be outside out. The neon green arrow points to where I had secured both raw ends of the piping with slanting it.